It’s usually tough to find a good design mentor. What’s tougher is finding a mentor that you can build a lasting, valuable relationship with. Whether you’re looking into getting a design mentor or already have one, here’s some tips and best practices for fostering a successful, fruitful relationship.

1. Set clear goals and expectation

Having clear goals and expectations in a mentor-mentee relationship not only creates a solid foundation to build upon, but it also helps you achieve your goals that much faster. What are the overarching goals of this relationship? What does success look like?

Be clear about your objectives and what you hope to gain from your relationship with your mentor.


In this guest post by Design Recruiter Carl Wheatley , get tips and best practices for making the most out of your relationship with your design mentor.

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Carl Wheatley — Product Design Recruiter @ Facebook

It’s usually tough to find a good design mentor. What’s tougher is finding a mentor that you can build a lasting, valuable relationship with. Whether you’re looking into getting a design mentor or already have one, here’s some tips and best practices for fostering a successful, fruitful relationship.

1. Set clear goals and expectation

Having clear goals and expectations in a mentor-mentee relationship not only creates a solid foundation to build upon, but it also helps you achieve your goals that much faster. …


Design Recruiter at Facebook Carl Wheatley explains why proactive storytelling in a UX design interview is one of the most powerful techniques for demonstrating your expertise and communication skills. Read on for three essential tips for telling a compelling story around your design work.

What would you do if you were sitting right in front of your interviewer and a moment of silence occurred? Would you sit and wait for them to break the silence, or speak up and make the moment interesting?

Most of the time, UX designers preparing for job interviews forget to put in the effort when it comes to driving the interview sessions. Instead of proactively participating in the discussion, they leave everything up to the interviewers. Well, this might be one of the worst mistakes ever. While your portfolio could be engaging and interesting, that’s not always enough. Usually, what matters the most is your active interactions which reveal your expertise and interest in the position you’re applying for. …


“An interview is meant to be a discussion session and not a one-way question and answer process.”

Hiring managers aren’t only looking for designers who can do the job well — they want to hire employees that show a genuine interest in the company and taking their product to the next level. …


Carl Wheatley is a Product Design Recruiter at Facebook with several years of experience in the design and recruiting industries. In this post, Carl sheds light on the most likely interview questions you’ll be asked in your UX design interview and how to approach answering each one.

Many UX designers preparing for an interview often focus all of their attention on the more technical questions related to their field. The reality is that hiring managers are also looking for candidates who can demonstrate qualities that go beyond the hard skills.

While you might expect to be asked intensive questions on UX or UI design, interviewers are more likely to ask things that gauge logical thinking skills and how you approach problem-solving. In fact, some companies’ favorite interview question for candidates is, “How would approach solving problems if you were from Mars?” That might sound like a bizarre question, without any relevance to the job, but they want to know how you would cope with simple problems outside of your working sphere. …


by Renee Fleck in Community | MAY 1, 2019

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Carl Wheatley is a Product Design Recruiter at Facebook with several years of experience in the design and recruiting industries. Having completed Bloc and Designlab bootcamps before becoming a recruiter, he’s an expert at helping designers land their first design job. Today he shares his tips for landing a job as a design professional entering the workforce.

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Carl WheatleyProduct Design Recruiter @ Facebook

Having started as a designer before becoming a recruiter, I know first-hand what it’s like to compete for the dream design job as well as the importance of selling yourself and putting your best foot forward. As a design recruiter now, I review hundreds of resumes and portfolios each week and have a very good understanding of what hiring managers like to see when reviewing potential candidates. Drawing on my experience in both aspects, I’ve rounded up a list of nine tips you’ll find helpful as a new design professional entering the workforce. …


I’m a design recruiter at Facebook. I recruit for Product Design Leadership. I For the past several years I’ve been in the design/recruiting industry. Before doing recruiting, I was a user experience designer and worked with many tech startups to design mobile apps. I also co-founded a Meetup called Global UXD where we connect designers with each other and create new opportunities.

Having started as a designer before becoming a recruiter, I know firsthand what it’s like to compete for the dream job and the importance of selling yourself and putting your best foot forward. …

About

Carl Wheatley

I specialize in the placement of Design professionals @ Facebook. Prior UI/UX Designer.

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